Launching a business-focused website is not a simple task, as you must build your online destination with commerce, search engine optimization, security, and other factors in mind. For a rock-solid website foundation that can withstand high traffic volumes and let you install your own scripts, however, a dedicated server is an easy choice—if you can afford one.
- Before signing up with a dedicated server, you should find out how much management freedom you will be given as far as server administration goes. When you run applications on such servers, it is assumed you have the expertise and knowhow to manage the servers. Your job is to find out if you have access to remote management modules too as offered by most of the reputed providers. Such remote management modules are helpful when you are changing from an IT onsite solution to a hosted environment. This works like a stop-gap arrangement which will keep the existing structures intact making the transition smooth for the staff.
Storage is extremely configurable, too. Some servers have four drive bays available, and they can be equipped with any mix of 1TB to 3TB SATA drives, or 120GB to 1TB SSDs. That's considerably more flexible than providers like 1&1, where you can only use SSD drives on some products, and even then they're often available in fixed configurations only (1TB SATA or 800GB SSD, for instance).
Building your website on a shared server means that your pages may be affected by a neighboring site that devours too many server resources. For example, if that site receives a huge spike in traffic, your pages might load slowly—or not at all. Investing in a dedicated server greatly reduces this potential problem, plus it gives system administrators greater control over the apps and scripts that they can install on the server, too. Shared hosting is far more limited when it comes to what you're allowed to do, because everything you do could potentially affect the other sites with which you share the server. When you've got the server all to yourself, your scripts and apps won't impinge on anyone else's bandwidth or RAM.
Some clients prefer Windows for its greater power and flexibility, while others go for Linux due to its good reputation, speed, reliability, and security. The price difference between the two is not much and each of them is good as long as it meets business needs. Most often, the real determinant in the OS choice is the technology the client wants to use on the site.
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Lastly, what kind of support does the hosting provider give to the customer? Customer support should be 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, especially if you are running an online business or a game that supports multiple users. You will want a hosting provider that makes it easy to get in touch should something go wrong or you want to upgrade before something does go wrong.
A cursory glance at the many web hosting services we've listed here reveals many similar-looking offerings, but the discerning eye will identify some subtle differences. You'll want a dedicated server with significant amounts of disk space—preferably 1TB or more—for storing files. You can typically choose either a traditional hard drive or a solid-state drive as your website's storage medium. There's a trade-off, however. Solid-state drives are often faster and more reliable than HDDs, but they cost more money and have smaller storage capacities. Traditional hard drives, on the other hand, have large capacities and lower prices but aren't quite as resilient as their SSD counterparts. Unless you truly need blazingly fast storage, a traditional hard drive will get the job done.
Storage is extremely configurable, too. Some servers have four drive bays available, and they can be equipped with any mix of 1TB to 3TB SATA drives, or 120GB to 1TB SSDs. That's considerably more flexible than providers like 1&1, where you can only use SSD drives on some products, and even then they're often available in fixed configurations only (1TB SATA or 800GB SSD, for instance).
If you are a business in need of a medium to enterprise-level website, then Bluehost is a great option with different packages for dedicated servers that match your budget. Bluehost provides a few features included with the price to make it a better option if you do not know how to set up a server or want to get through setup as quickly as possible.
Unlike a shared server, which powers multiple sites, a dedicated server hosts just one site. Website stability and reliability are the twin benefits of investing in a dedicated server—your site leverages a server's full CPU, RAM, and storage resources, as it doesn't share them with other sites. You shouldn't underestimate the importance of these benefits in terms of site speed and reliability.
Their answers were simple and precise. They answered exactly what we asked, but nothing more – so there is a little room for improvement. But overall Bluehost support beats many other supports we’ve seen, who have trouble with the English language, who only copy-paste answers or links, or are (in worst case scenario) an early version of an artificial intelligence-based program.
In most cases, people fail to realize that no hosting providers are the same. Others make the mistake of basing their purchasing decisions on prices only. Although it is understandable that everyone desires to operate on the lowest budget possible, choosing the cheapest option may end up leading to poor customer service, reliability issues, and security concerns among other shortcomings.
Like any other hosting solution, dedicated servers require multiple layers of security to protect the server, the website, the company’s brand awareness and its client’s data and safety. Securing your dedicated server’s security does not have to be a heartache. In fact, If you followed our tips, you will see that the process is pretty simple. Consequently, helping you to make informed choices on the best servers for your business.
A: Prices can vary greatly depending on resource allocation and hardware quality. You can expect anything from $70-$90/mo for smaller projects, up to $300+ for enterprise-level solutions. Nevertheless, clients often need a dedicated server because their projects require a specific environment, so it’s best first to confirm your configuration with the support.


For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Lead Analyst.
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