A dedicated server is a single physical computer engineered to support multiple users, run a large number of different services and applications, and manage, store, send and process data 24-hours a day. A dedicated server allows for all the resources of the physical computer to be "dedicated" to one client and the hardware resources are not shared with any other clients. This is in contrast to shared servers and cloud servers where the resources of the physical computer system are shared amongst many clients.
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A dedicated server is a single physical computer engineered to support multiple users, run a large number of different services and applications, and manage, store, send and process data 24-hours a day. A dedicated server allows for all the resources of the physical computer to be "dedicated" to one client and the hardware resources are not shared with any other clients. This is in contrast to shared servers and cloud servers where the resources of the physical computer system are shared amongst many clients.
Bandwidth consumption over the last several years has shifted from a per megabit usage model to a per gigabyte usage model. Bandwidth was traditionally measured in line speed access that included the ability to purchase needed megabits at a given monthly cost. As the shared hosting model developed, the trend towards gigabyte or total bytes transferred, replaced the megabit line speed model so dedicated server providers started offering per gigabyte.
If you register a domain with Bluehost when signing up for a hosting account, there is a domain fee that is non-refundable. This not only covers our costs, but ensures that you won't lose your domain name. Regardless of the status of your hosting service, you'll be free to manage it, transfer it after any required lock periods, or simply point it elsewhere at your convenience. You retain ownership of your domain until the end of its registration period unless you elect to extend it.
Alexandra Leslie’s interest in website administration was sparked in her teens, priming her for a fast-paced career in managing, building, and contributing to online brands, including HostingAdvice, Forbes, and the blogs of prominent hosting providers. She brings to the table firsthand experience in reviewing web hosts, perfecting website design, optimizing content, and walking site owners through the steps that add up to a successful online presence. Today, she combines her extensive writing experience with technical understanding to unpack some of the most complex topics that daunt novice website owners, as well as the subjects that excite veteran technologists within the HostingAdvice readership.
The answer to this question largely depends on two factors. Are you new to server technology and not very interested? In this case, Windows is the easiest option to get where you want to go. Do you already have experience with Linux or would you like to familiarize yourself with this operating system? If so, Linux gives you more freedoms to configure your server, and you will be using an operating system that is less vulnerable to attacks from the Internet. Linux is also open source and therefore free.
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